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dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Normanen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:33:46Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:33:46Z
dc.date.issued1932en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35000
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe Land Regulations fall into three distinct phases. The first, or the Colonies from without, has to do with those aspects of official policy up to 1815 that paid little or no regard to the pressing needs of the Colonies, and were marked by an alienation of waste lands out of all proportion to the population. The second forms an interlude that marks the first step in the surrender to colonial criticism, and partakes of old and new ideas of settlement. The third phase, or the Colonies from within, clearly admits the existence of a Canadian point of view, recognises the glaring mistakes of past regulations, and the need of a new policy.en
dc.description.abstractIn the first phase are six chapters. The first deals with Emigration and Immigration, and is intended to show the social and economic conditions in the British Isles and the influence of the New World that created the desire to emigrate, together with a brief account of the various auxiliaries that stimulated the spirit of emigration, and considered necessary as an introduction to the application of the Land Regulationsto Canada. And since the primary need in those distant days was felt to be the defence of the Colonies, the second chapter takes up the formation of frontier settlements, composed of soldiers who were rewarded by grants of land. The third chapter shows the various attempts made to induce emigrants to settle in Canada; empty spaces were retarded not only as a liability but as a positive danger to the peade of the State. The fourth chapter traces the extent to which waste lands were used to reward civil officials and others to whom the Government was under some particular obligation, while in the fifth chapter, the activities of certain capitalists and their contribution to the development of the Colonies are portrayed. Chapter six recognises certain salient lessons drawn from the loss of the 'Alder Colonies.' The question of revenue was always urgent and colonists objected to being taxed for Imperial purposes. Similarly, religion and loyalty were regarded as State affairs. This chapter attempts to trace' the various means adopted to secure sufficient revenue from waste lands without taxing the settlers, and to subsidize religion in the interests of patriotism by the creation of Clergy Reserves. The second phase, comprising chapter seven, is the devoted to the formation of /Military and other settlements at the expense and under the supervision of the Imperial Government. The third phase endeavours to show the influence of local criticism upon the Colonial Office. To secure executive independence, a source of revenue outside the control of the Assemblies was considered essential. For this purpose huge tracts of land, as shown in chapter eight, were sold to Land Companies. By this time the influence of Wakefield's ideas were slowly converting the Colonial Office to the wise policy of selling all the waste lands instead of jobbing them. In chapter nine may be found the various steps in the struggle that freed the waste lands of Canada from outside control. The political, social, and material consequences of the administration of these regulations are traced in chapters ten and eleven, while chapter twelve forms a criticism of the most outstanding demerits of the system, and of a few of the most responsible officials.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleThe Imperial Land Regulations as applied to Canadaen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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