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dc.contributor.authorMacQueen, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:34:42Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:34:42Z
dc.date.issued1931en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35100
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractPART I. A brief account of the history of syphilis is given. Classical endemics in Scotland, Norway and Sweden, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Russia and other countries are described. The scarcity of primary manifestations and apparent rarity of sequelae on the one hand and the preponderance of mucous membrane and skin lesions on the other provide a contrast to what is observed in the modern venereal diseases’ clinic. These facts suggest a difference either in the habits of the spirochaete or in its surroundings. Syphilis appears to have become common in the Turkish Empire about the year 1840. PART II. A detailed account of the author’s original work in Palestine is given. The disease, as observed there by him, closely resembles the endemics described in Part I. There is the same scarcity of primary lesions and apparent rarity of sequelae. The view is gradually developed that the difference between endemic and sporadic syphilis is mainly that between an innocent and a venereal disease. The author does not however maintain that the low incidence of sequelae is so explained. PART III. The author holds Paterson’s view that syphilis was introduced into the endemic area about the year 1840. The statements of that worker, recorded in this paper for the first time, prove the incorrectness of the opinion generally expressed until to-day. According to this the British Army was responsible for the introduction of the disease during the Great War. A stain has thus been removed from the banner of the Last Crusade. The reasons for regarding the disease as syphilis and not yaws are given. The view that treatment by means of tabloids of Spirocid forms an advance in the control of endemic syphilis amongst native races is maintained. Finally the evidence in favour of the author’s view that endemic syphilis is non-venereally spread is displayed.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleStudy of endemic syphilis in Palestineen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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