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dc.contributor.authorMcCurrach, Paul H.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:35:52Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:35:52Z
dc.date.issued1968en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35213
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThis work was carried out in order to investigate the actions of drugs known to induce agranulocytosis on certain metabolic reactions of human leucocytes. Lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) were separated "in vitro" from samples of normal human blood, utilising the property of PMN whereby they will adhere to siliconed glass surfaces while lymphocytes do not adhere. The respiration and lactic acid production of the separated leucocytes was measured using manometric and enzymic methods respectively. It was found that drugs inducing predominately agranulocytosis - chlorpromazine, amidopyrine, and thiouracil - inhibited PMN respiration by 20% at concentrations which occur "in vivo" under normal therapeutic conditions. Drugs inducing both agranulocytosis and aplastic anaemia - phenylbutazone and chloramphenicol - showed little inhibitory activity on PMN respiration. No drugs exerted any apparent effect on lymphocyte respiration and on PMN lactic acid production. The significance of these results was discussed.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleSome aspects of leucocyte metabolism: "in vitro" effects of drugs inducing agranulocytosis on separated human lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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