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dc.contributor.authorMcKinlay, Archibald Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:36:21Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:36:21Z
dc.date.issued1974en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35261
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe period covered by this paper, from the early eighteenth to the opening of the twentieth century, was one of remarkable progress and development for Scotland's agriculture generally. From a deplorably backward and inefficient agricultural country she rose in the course of two centuries to become one of the most highly mechanised and forward -looking farming communities in western Europe. This progress was especially rapid in favourable situations like East Lothian where relatively fertile soil, climatic conditions, the early development of transport facilities, and the close proximity of a large centre of population like Edinburgh, all aided development. To these must also be added the influence of able and enthusiastic individuals who, either brought in new methods and ideas, or made an effort to spread existing improvements and the results of experiments by means of lectures, correspondence, the printed word, or practical example.en
dc.description.abstractIn this process, technological advance depended on specialist education in agriculture and the related sciences, but not on that alone. It was equally evident that a general uplifting of basic educational standards of the whole rural community was a necessary pre-requisite to ensure scientific and technological advance. The founders of the Haddington School of Arts saw that very clearly and responded to the need in their provision of a wide diversity of courses in their educational programme. Visitors to the Great Exhibition of 1851 were also, convinced of the need to reassess general educational standards to improve technical efficiency in the light of growing foreign competition. The Haddington School Board endeavored to provide sound basic courses of education so that future specialist knowledge could rest on strong foundations., Professor Wallace of the University of Edinburgh insisted on practical training, together with schoolroom learning as the soundest base for future specialist studies. A measure of their success can be seen in the fact that where Cockburn of Ormiston had to struggle manfully to convince fellow Scots in his own parish that ideas from the outside world could be of value and benefit to them, Professor Wallace, about two centuries later, was sending out highly trained Scots to every quarter of the globe as teachers, managers, and agricultural advisers.en
dc.description.abstractThe initial beginnings of improvement of Scotland's agriculture appear to have been originally an imported idea from countries like England and Holland where farming practice was core advanced, tut import d by her own sons -- not by foreigners. The Edinburgh Society of Improvers became the first society to generate ideas and distribute agricultural knowledge,that Scotland had known. Party by its influence and by the influence of the general growth of science and technology brought forward in the mechanics' institute movement, local societies like the Haddington School of Arts b -came the main vehicles of advance. The essence, of the printed word to education in a dispersed, rural area through cheap publications or village libraries was also of marked importance, as was the visible example of improved methods given by practising farmers in the area. These, however, proved to be inadequate to bear the growing pressure which the increasing needs of education and the mounting volume of scientific and technological knowledge placed on their resources. Though local school boards could provide a basic education for the children and young adults in their on area, they had neither the financial resources nor the facilities to provide full programmes of adult education, especially in such demanding subjects as agriculture or its related sciences. Improved transport towards the last decades of the nineteenth century Enabled East Lothian people more ready access to Edinburgh, where the advantages to be gained from centralizing agricultural education in larger units could be fully utilised. These advantages, however, had to be carefully weighed against a growing remoteness of the main centre of agricultural education from the farming community in the counties. A sensible via media was arrived at in the courses prvided by the Edinburgh and East of Scotland College of Agriculture in the opening years of this century.en
dc.description.abstractThe development of facilities and the widening of the scope of agricultural education may be viewed. both as an accumulative and as a continually varying process. Each generation throw bout the period contributed something of value and helped to prepare the way for the next addition or improvement. Although the early societies may appear in retrospect as unsophisticated and woefully inadequate in their resources, they nevertheless played a vital part in their contribution to the general advance. It was from such humble beginnings that our present system of nation-wide provision in agricultural education and research developed. The importance of such advance to Scotland as a nation cannot be over stressed, ad George Henderson reminds us:en
dc.description.abstractIn the soil lies all that remains of the work of countless generations of the dead. We hold this sacred trust, to maintain the fertility and pass it on unimpaired to the generations to come. The farmer above all must have faith in the future... for a civilization lasts but a thousand years, while in his hands lies the destiny of all mankind.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleSome aspects of rural adult education with special reference to East Lothianen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMEd Master of Educationen


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