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dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Juliusen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:36:54Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:36:54Z
dc.date.issued1936en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35316
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstract(1) A survey of l00 cases and critical exposition of the literature has been undertaken. (2) Improvement was noted in 63.3% of cases of which 30% were slightly improved and 14.4% much improved. ( 3) Indications, contraindications', prophylaxis and the ultimate difficulties of the treatment have been discussed: (a) Crisalbine may be given to cases pyrexial or apyrexial, not improving or stationary with sputum still positive for Koch's bacillus and undergoing routine Sanatorium treatment. (b) it is useful in conjunction with collapse therapy, where an artificial pneumothorax is contemplated or has been induced to control disease in the contralateral lung. (c) it may be used in both the exudative and productive type of case. (d) it may be used where other treatment has proved unavailing; and where the time or economic factor is important. (4) It is not a "cure" but is of value as an adjuvant in the treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis; its limitations and dangers must be recognised. (a) It produces evidences of Toxicity in 57.8% of cases. (b) It is contraindicated in associated cardiac, renal or hepatic disease. (c) Good results are not generally obtained in advanced cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. (d) It will not replace other tried methods of treatment and is generally not required where other methods are satisfactory, but may be used in conjunction with these. (5) It is of limited value; a few selected cases show good results; a fair percentage are slightly improved and life prolonged, and no case of death was directly attributable to Crisalbine. It will not save life. There is little, if any, value in the drug in uncollapsed cavities. Each case must be judged on its own merits: the dose should be small (0.05 gm.) ; gradually increased; reactions should be carefully studied. (6) There is no proved experimental basis for its use in Pulmonary Tuberculosis. Its precise action in the human body is unknown: it is more a Stimulation Therapy than a true Chemotherapy. (7) Its value from a public health standpoint has been discussed: the bacillary loss of sputum is not generally permanent. It must still have a limited sphere and cannot be generally employed by all. (8) Results are based on clinical values; immediate and remote results are difficult to judge and often prove rather disappointing. (9) It is possible that remote reactions caused by gold may have a wider effect than is at present generally realised: there is also evidence that examination of the blood cells may afford a standard for the assessment of its value in this disease. (10) It is still a highly controversial subject; there is hope that a substance related to this gold compound, having a minimal effect on the human body, may yet be forthcoming. It should not be withdrawn from clinical use, and should be employed with due regard to the resistance and reactions of the patient in certain selected cases. It should have a place in the armamentaria of the Physician in his fight against Tuberculosis.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleGold therapy in pulmonary tuberculosisen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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