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dc.contributor.authorMillar, William Malcolmen
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:36:58Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:36:58Z
dc.date.issued1939en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35326
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstract(1). An historical introduction to the treatment of insanity is outlined. The development of the hypoglycaemic treatment is traced. (2). The case material reviewed in this thesis consist of 46 patients. Case summaries are included and are divided into two groups - Group I treated by Dr Strecker, and Group II treated by the writer. Of these, 40 were diagnosed as suffering from schizophrenia. (3). An account of the treatment is given in detail. The symptomatology is described at length, particular reference being made to the definition of coma. An account is given of the blood sugar changes, together with a t able. A relationship between coma and blood sugar was found, namely, that for coma to be produced a mean fall of 80% was necessary and. that the more rapid the fall the deeper the coma. The onset of coma seemed to coincide with an acceleration of the pulse and a raised blood, pressure. This is recorded graphically. (4). The management of hypoglycaemia has been d.iscusse and certain points in technique have been emphasised. The difficulties and dangers have been enumerated, and their prophylaxis and treat ment discussed. These undesirable phenomena are rare and usually avoidable. (5). The effects of hypoglycaemia upon the individual have been reviewed. It is considered that there is ample physiological foundation for this treatment in schizophrenia. The mental effects have been considered. Periods of lucidity are discussed and related to the fugue states of diabetics. The undoubted sedative effect of treatment in many cases is made clear. (6). Three types of remission are defined - complete, incomplete and partial. Two Tables of results are given. (7). In the evaluation of results the two groups of cases are dealt with separately. The poor results in Group I are attributed to the unsatisfactory case material, and to the inadequa treatment in many of them. It is considered that the results of treatment in Group II. though perhaps not so satisfactory as might half been hoped, are undoubtedly better than in spontaneous remissions. (8). Insulin treatment is looked upon, not as a method of treatment in itself, but as an important psycho-biological factor which, used in conjunction with other methods of treatment such a psychotherapy and occupational therapy, seems to accelerate the process of recovery - and make this more complete - in essentially recoverable cases. (9). With the modified technique described, it is maintained that treatment can be carried out in the normal hospital routine with no great difficult or undue expenditure of time and money.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleInsulin hypoglycaemia in the treatment of the psychosesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameMD Doctor of Medicineen


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