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dc.contributor.authorMoffat, Margaret A. J.en
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-15T14:37:29Z
dc.date.available2019-02-15T14:37:29Z
dc.date.issued1960en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/35369
dc.description.abstracten
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between host cells and members of the Myxovirus group has been reviewed with particular reference to the growth of these viruses in tissue culture. Virus multiplication, incomplete virus production and the phenomenon of interference have also been considered. It became apparent from the literature that certain members of the group, for example, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and influenza, differ significantly from each other in various growth characteristics. It was considered advantageous to study further the differences between these two viruses and their growth characteristics were therefore investigated in various tissue culture systems.en
dc.description.abstractThe experiments were planned to study: - (a) the cytopathic effect of these viruses on their host cells and the relationship between this effect and the production of new virus, (b) cell survival following infection, (c) the possibility of incomplete virus formation. During the course of the study it became possible to investigate in addition the intracellular development of influenza virus.en
dc.description.abstract(a) Cytopathic effect The cytopathic effect of NDV in HeLa cells was examined by ordinary microscopy and by time -lapse cinematography using interference microscopy. The changes associated with infection could be divided into three phases, namely the appearance in the cell monolayer of circular foci of infection termed "microplaques ", the ensuing formation of syncytial masses and finally complete cellular degeneration.en
dc.description.abstractThe cytopathic effect of influenza virus was studied in monkey kidney and bovine embryo kidney cells. The changes differed from those observed with NDV and included vacuolation and granulation of the cytoplasm and the appearance of intranuclear vacuoles. Nuclear changes were also observed with the acridine orange technique; the extent and pattern of these changes depended on the strain of virus used.en
dc.description.abstractWith both viruses, when small inocula were used, the cytopathic effects were accompanied by an increase in infective and haemagglutinating virus.en
dc.description.abstract(b) Cell survival following infection Cells subjected to a large dose of NDV survived better than cells similarly treated with influenza virus. It is suggested that this may be due to a difference in toxicity of the viruses. In further experiments, incomplete influenza virus, which is known to be less toxic, produced a less extensive cytopathic effect.en
dc.description.abstractTreatment of the cells with immune serum following infection with NDV reduced cytopathic changes.en
dc.description.abstract(c) Incomplete virus formation Although infection of HeLa cells with large inocula of NDV did not result in the production of detectable infective virus no evidence for the formation of incomplete virus was obtained.en
dc.description.abstractWith influenza virus, on the other hand, evidence was obtained for the production of incomplete virus following undiluted serial passage in ionkey kidney cells. The phenomenon was, however, never as striking as that observed in eggs. It is suggested that this may be due to the lower titres obtained in tissue cultures.en
dc.description.abstractTHE INTRACELLULAR DEVELOPMENT OF INFLUENZA VIRUS By means of the fluorescent antibody technique using specific antisera, the S and V antigens of influenza virus could be detected in bovine embryo kidney cells and in HeLa cells. The S antigen was first detected in the nucleus whereas the V antigen appeared slightly later in the cytoplasm. It seems feasible that in the case of influenza- infected bovine embryo kidney cells the S and V antigens combine at the surface of the cell prior to their release as complete virus. With HeLa cells S and V antigens are produced in the cells but only incomplete virus is released.en
dc.description.abstractWhen large inocula were employed, nuclear fluorescence with S antiserum was never as intense as that observed in cells infected with a small dose of virus. This indicates that less S antigen per cell was produced when lame inocula were employed and suggests the formation of incomplete virus.en
dc.description.abstractOn the basis of these findings a hypothesis has been put forward to explain the formation of incomplete influenza virus. As this phenomenon is so intimately linked to the relationship between virus and host cell it is conceivable that NDV, which has been found to differ from influenza virus in many growth characteristics, should not be able to induce the production of incomplete virus.en
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.ispartofAnnexe Thesis Digitisation Project 2019 Block 22en
dc.relation.isreferencedbyen
dc.titleGrowth in tissue culture of two members of the myxovirus groupen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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