Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Stuart
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robin
dc.contributor.authorDaneshvar Farzanegan, Sayed Hadi
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-22T11:41:48Z
dc.date.available2019-11-22T11:41:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-23
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/36395
dc.description.abstractThe future of health and care services in the EU faces the three challenges of the aging population, fiscal restriction, and social inclusion. Co-production offers ways to manage informal care resources to enable them to better cater to the growing needs of elderly people. Social Media (SM) are seen as a critical enabler of co-production. This study investigates SM as an enabler of co-production in health and care for elderly people and develops a typology of opportunities and limitations of SM in relation to health and care. The study considers how SM acts as an enabler of co-production in health and care by facilitating its four underlying principles: equality, diversity, accessibility, and reciprocity. Normalization Process Theory (NPT) provides the theoretical framework for this qualitative study. Eighteen semi-structured interviews and observation of the activities of 10 online groups and individuals provide the data for the thematically-analysed findings. The study findings show how different SM are used to enable co-production through coordination and communication across boundaries. SM connects carers, disseminates information and engages volunteers. However, many types of SM are only rarely used in this sector due to their limitations. Nevertheless, carers of elderly patients demonstrated interest in using systems to engage people in the shaping of services, the sharing of experiences and encouraging activities. The study findings point to distinct patterns of feature use by different people involved in the care of elderly people. This diversity makes possible the principles of co-production by offering equality among users, enabling diversity of use, making experiences accessible, and encouraging reciprocity in the sharing of knowledge and mutual support. Exploitation of common resources also may lead to new forms of competition and conflicts. These conflicts require better management to enhance the coordination of the common pool of resources. The study finds that SM can facilitate co-production by offering mechanisms for coordination of the common pool of carer resources. It also enables better management of activities amongst other actors (professionals, patients, voluntary organisations, etc.). The study also demonstrates that, despite the capabilities of SM in achieving coproduction, many applications (both general and healthcare-specific) are not used to their full potential. The study also explores new innovations in this field and why they have failed to deliver their intended services.en
dc.contributor.sponsorotheren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionHow Can Current Social Media Lead to Co-production (Co-Delivery) of New Services? A Qualitative Study, H. Daneshvar, S. Anderson, R. Williams and H. Mozaffar, JMIR Hum Factors 2018; 5(1):e5, DOI: 10.2196/humanfactors.7856en
dc.relation.hasversionThe Impact of Social Media on Reshaping of Healthcare Delivery for Elderly People: The Intended and Unintended Consequences, Pre ECIS-Workshop: New Technologies, Organisations and Work, Portsmouth, the UK, June 2018en
dc.relation.hasversionChallenges and Opportunities of Health and Care Co-production with Social Media: a Qualitative Study. 6th International Workshop on Infrastructures for Healthcare: Infrastructures for governance, quality improvement and service efficiency, Aarhus, Denmark, June 2017en
dc.relation.hasversionHow Existing Social Media Assist Health and Care Co-production: a Qualitative Study? MCCSIS 2016, Madeira, Portugal, 1- 3 July 2016en
dc.relation.hasversionCan Existing Social Media Encourage Health and Care Co-production? BCS Health Informatics Scotland 2015, Edinburgh, the UK, 7-8 October 2015en
dc.relation.hasversionSocial Media in Health and Care with Co-production in Future – Medicine 2.0’14 Europe, Malaga, Spain 9 October 2014en
dc.relation.hasversionFuture of Social Media in Health and Care with Co-production – International Digital Health and Care Congress, Kings Fund 2014, London, the UK, 11 September 2014en
dc.relation.hasversionCo-production of Health and Care through use of Social Media – poster presentation and present in SICSA PhD Conferences and HCI Doctoral Consortium 2014, St Andrews University, the UK, 9-10 June 2014en
dc.subjectco-productionen
dc.subjectsocial mediaen
dc.subjecthealth informaticsen
dc.subjectE-healthen
dc.subjectmedical informaticsen
dc.titleSocial media in health and care co-productionen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.embargodate2020-11-23en


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record