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Proceedings of the 11th ACM SIGPLAN conference on Principles and practice of declarative programming - PPDP 09

dc.contributor.authorCooper, Ezra
dc.contributor.authorWadler, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-25T08:50:25Z
dc.date.available2010-08-25T08:50:25Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.isbn9781605585680en
dc.identifier.urihttp://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1599410.1599439en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/3682
dc.description.abstractSeveral recent language designs have offered a unified language for programming a distributed system, with explicit notation of locations; we call these “location-aware” languages. These languages provide constructs allowing the programmer to control the location (the choice of host, for example) where a piece of code should run, which can be useful for security or performance reasons. On the other hand, a central mantra of WWW system engineering prescribes that web servers should be “stateless”: that no “session state” should be maintained on behalf of individual clients—that is, no state that pertains to the particular point of the interaction at which a client program resides. Many implementations of locationaware languages are not at home on the web: they hold some kind of client-specific state on the server. We show how to implement a symmetrical location-aware language on top of a stateless server.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLanguage Constructsen
dc.subjectLanguage Featuresen
dc.subjectInformaticsen
dc.subjectComputer Scienceen
dc.titleThe RPC Calculusen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/1599410.1599439en
rps.titleProceedings of the 11th ACM SIGPLAN conference on Principles and practice of declarative programming - PPDP 09en
dc.extent.noOfPages11en
dc.date.updated2010-08-25T08:50:26Z


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