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dc.contributor.advisorHarris, Mark
dc.contributor.advisorJack, Alison
dc.contributor.authorWright, Jaime Marie
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T12:33:09Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T12:33:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-29
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/36930
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/231
dc.description.abstractThis thesis proposes and maps a nascent subfield of scholarship within the science-and-religion field that examines the intersection of science, religion, and literature; simultaneously, it draws out and argues for the benefits of incorporating literature into science-and-religion studies. The suggested label for this body of scholarship is the science-religion-and-literature field. Scholarship within this proposed field is relatively new and has yet to be thus brought together. The mapping of this field is done by considering how literature is incorporated into science-and-religion studies. Although there is a growing body of scholarship that incorporates literature into science-and-religion studies, scholarship has yet to address how incorporating literature benefits the wider science-and-religion field. Therefore, this thesis argues that there are ways to incorporate literature that allow literary texts and the tools of literary analysis to bring insights to the science-and-religion field. This thesis is composed of four parts. Part one introduces and maps the subfield of science-religion-and-literature by defining and, at times, coining key terms and phrases, providing an overview of method within the larger science-and-religion field, and mapping the proposed subfield by reviewing exemplary studies. Part two examines the use of literary theory at the intersection of literature with society, religion, and science. Part three portrays a use of particular literary texts (the case study: Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy) that seeks to bring insight to the science-and-religion field. The study concludes in part four by assessing various methods that have been portrayed throughout this thesis, articulating the benefits of studying literature within the science-and-religion field, and suggesting further directions of research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionWright, Jaime. ‘Emily Dickinson: A Poet at the Limits’. Theology in Scotland 24, no. 1 (2017): 35–50en
dc.relation.hasversionWright, Jaime. ‘In the Beginning: The Role of Myth in Relating Religion, Brain Science, and Mental Well-Being’. Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science 53, no. 2 (2018): 375–91.en
dc.relation.hasversionWright, Jaime. This World Is Not Conclusion: An Analysis of the Limits of Religious and Scientific Knowledge as Portrayed in Emily Dickinson’s Poetry’. Master’s Thesis. Edinburgh University, 2015en
dc.subjectscience-and-religionen
dc.subjectMargaret Atwooden
dc.subjectMaddAddam trilogyen
dc.subjectliteratureen
dc.titleScience-religion-and-literature: literary approaches to the field of science-and-religion with Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy as a case studyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.relation.referencesMargaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogyen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.embargodate2021-06-29en
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen


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