Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorCalia, Claraen
dc.contributor.advisorSummers, Fionaen
dc.contributor.advisorTrevethan, Cerien
dc.contributor.authorInsch, Pauline M.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-07T15:54:14Z
dc.date.available2020-10-07T15:54:14Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/37341
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/627
dc.description.abstractPurpose Chapter one used the Self-Regulation Model (SRM) of health beliefs as a framework to review results from psychological interventions that utilised health belief outcomes based on the SRM for people with Functional Neurological Disorder. The empirical chapter used demographic, psychological and healthcare utilisation outcomes to explore the efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for routine care for people with FND designed to address a gap in current service provision within NHS Grampian. Method A systematic search strategy identified seven studies for inclusion in the review chapter. Chapter two compared the data of attenders (n=16) and non-attenders (n=13) on demographic, psychological and healthcare utilisation variables. Data from group completers was collected at four timepoints and included cognitive function, mood, quality of life, health beliefs, healthcare utilisation and costs; Participant knowledge and experiential data was also collected. Results Chapter one showed studies were of mixed quality with studies being rated as satisfactory (n=4) unsatisfactory quality (n=3). Higher quality studies had more comprehensive selection and data management processes than lower quality studies. In chapter 2 non-attenders rated their physical health limitations as significantly more and perceived less personal control than attenders. Completers showed significant improvements in understanding of FND and in levels of fatigue were reported as significantly less at follow up. No differences between attenders and non-attenders for healthcare utilisation or costs. 63% of completers showed improved health status at follow up, participant expectations were met. knowledge of FND significantly improved. The content and format of the intervention were acceptable to participants Conclusions Taken together both chapters highlighted the role of health beliefs in FND but also the importance of providing access to appropriate information and peer support for those receiving a diagnosis. The brief intervention showed promising results in terms of efficacy, feasibility and acceptability. Although further research will be required to ascertain if these findings are sustainable in a larger sample long term.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjecthealth beliefsen
dc.subjectillness perceptionen
dc.subjectFunctional Neurological Disorderen
dc.subjectpsychological interventionsen
dc.subjectSelf-regulation Modelen
dc.titleBrief group intervention to support people with Functional Neurological Disorder in the Acute Sector: a feasibility studyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDClinPsychol Doctorate in Clinical Psychologyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record