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dc.contributor.advisorReid, Corinne
dc.contributor.advisorGirard, Lisa-Christine
dc.contributor.advisorMacBeth, Angus
dc.contributor.advisorMaddox, Hilary
dc.contributor.authorSwartzman, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-07T15:58:30Z
dc.date.available2020-10-07T15:58:30Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/37342
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/628
dc.description.abstractThis thesis contains three chapters: two empirical chapters and a systematic review chapter. The first two empirical chapters use data from the Growing Up in Scotland cohort. The first chapter describes a group-based multi-trajectory analysis which distinguishes children following five different trajectory patterns on three behaviours at once: conduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention (HI), and peer problems. These groups can be described as follows: Group 1 (17.4% of the sample) never engaged in conduct problems, with low and decreasing HI and no peer problems throughout childhood. Group 2 (23.3%), similarly, had low constant conduct problems, decreasing HI, and no peer problems. Group 3 (20.5%) demonstrated low levels of decreasing conduct problems, low and constant HI, and low constant peer problems. Group 4 (29.1%) demonstrated decreasing conduct problems, high HI peaking around age 5, and low steady peer problems. Group 5 (9.7%) had high persisting conduct problems, high HI peaking around age 7, and increasing peer problems throughout childhood. The second chapter describes a multinomial logistic regression analysis testing several early childhood predictors of belonging to each of the five trajectory groups. It was found that several child-level factors predicted belonging to groups other than group 1 (the lowest-risk group): male sex, expressive language abilities, breastfeeding, and mother’s smoking during pregnancy. However, environmental factors also predicted membership in higher-risk groups, including parental smacking and shouting, primary caregiver mental health, primary caregiver-infant attachment, child insecure attachment, number of siblings, parental marital status, primary caregiver education level, and social deprivation level. The third chapter describes a systematic review and narrative synthesis of studies reporting associations between childhood conduct problems and perceived social isolation, or loneliness. This systematic review is intended to “zoom in” on the finding from the first chapter that children with high constant conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattention also tend to have increasing peer problems over the course of childhood. Loneliness is a key feature of peer problems which also, in the long-term, leads to a variety of negative psychosocial outcomes. The systematic review is therefore intended to clarify the relationship between conduct problems and loneliness in particular. The studies included in the review reported mixed evidence on this relationship, including positive, negative, and nonsignificant correlations. Several papers reported that conduct problems were associated with increased loneliness. As discussed throughout the thesis, the results have implications for early clinical psychological interventions aiming to deflect children from risky behavioural trajectories. The results suggest that supportive interventions for new parents may be effective in addition to child-focused interventions in later childhood. The results also emphasise the need for social integration among children demonstrating conduct problems and hyperactivity/inattentionen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectsystematic reviewen
dc.subjectconduct problemsen
dc.subjectpeer problemsen
dc.subjecttrajectoryen
dc.subjecthyperactivity/inattentionen
dc.titleConduct problems, hyperactivity/inattention, and peer problems among Scottish childrenen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDClinPsychol Doctorate in Clinical Psychologyen


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