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dc.contributor.authorBerrie, Laurieen
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-28T13:30:11Z
dc.date.available2020-10-28T13:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-28
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/37441
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/726
dc.description.abstractThis work explores the hypothesis that some youth movements, such as Scouts and Guides, have an approach to youth development which enhances soft cognitive skills. These skills may subsequently increase later life social mobility - particularly in those who are from more disadvantaged backgrounds - and through this mechanism they may experience better health outcomes compared to their peers. It uses data from the Aberdeen Children of the 1950s cohort.en
dc.contributor.sponsorScottish Centre for Administrative Data Researchen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherScottish Centre for Administrative Data Researchen
dc.subjectYoung peopleen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectSocial mobilityen
dc.subjectInequalityen
dc.subjectAberdeenen
dc.titleData Insights: Youth movements, social mobility and health inequalitiesen
dc.typeOtheren


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