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dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Joanne
dc.contributor.advisorRzepecka, Halina
dc.contributor.advisorMcCafferty, Aileen
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Lianne
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-07T10:08:01Z
dc.date.available2021-10-07T10:08:01Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-31
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/38129
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/1398
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aimed to investigate the growing interest in research and clinical practice relatedto the inclusion of animals in a broad range of intervention services, particularly forindividuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The first chapter is a systematic reviewand meta-analysis reviewing Animal Assisted Therapies (AAT’s) and Animal AssistedInterventions (AAI’s) to identify any potential benefits for individuals with ASD (O’Haire,2013) and review the quality of the evidence because some have commented that theevidence base lacks scientific merit (Lentini & Knox, 2015). Eleven scientifically robuststudies (3 RCT’s, 1 follow up to RCT and 7 Control Condition studies) were included fornarrative synthesis. Three RCT’s were subject to an exploratory meta-analysis. Resultsindicate benefits social function and well-being outcomes for individuals with ASD;however, there is a high level of variability across length of intervention and degree of followup post intervention. Further effort in this area should focus on standardising interventionsand creating a consensus on AAT/Is (Lentini & Knox, 2015) with particular consideration ofspecies involved.The second chapter is an empirical study exploring the role of pet dogs in families withchildren with ASD. A cross-sectional survey was completed by 46 families living with acompanion dog and 30 families without a companion dog. Data was gathered on child andparent reports of family functioning, child quality of life, child social communication,parental stress, parents reports on impact of the dog on their child with autism, andrelationships of children and parents with their dog. Data was analysed using Tests ofDifference, exploratory Linear Regression and Correlations to explore the groups differencesand the role of the dog within the dog families. Improved family functioning and childquality of life were found in the dog group compared to the no dog group. Parent-dogrelationship also impacted on child-dog relationship. These findings need to be replicatedwith larger groups and with the addition of qualitative data to provide richer understandinginto the role of dogs in families with children of ASD; however, these findings are a positivecontribution to a growing evidence base.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectASDen
dc.subjectRCT’sen
dc.subjectcontrol trialsen
dc.subjectanimal-assisted interventionsen
dc.subjectAAIsen
dc.subjectanimal assisted therapyen
dc.subjectAATsen
dc.subjectAutism Spectrum Disordersen
dc.subjectASDen
dc.subjectpet dogsen
dc.subjectfamily perspectiveen
dc.subjectcontrol comparisonen
dc.titleAnimal Assisted Therapy (AAT) and Animal Assisted Intervention (AAI) for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised control trials (RCT's) and Control Trial Studies and; Man's best friend: What is the difference in outcomes (family functioning, quality of life, parental stress and child social communication) in families that have a dog present with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): a control comparison study.en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDClinPsychol Doctorate in Clinical Psychologyen


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