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dc.contributor.advisorMarder, Ben
dc.contributor.advisorMarshall, David
dc.contributor.authorAlRabiah, Sara
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-11T11:05:28Z
dc.date.available2021-11-11T11:05:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-31
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/38242
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/1508
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the impact of self-disclosure by Social Media Influencers (SMIs) on consumer outcomes with particular reference to travel influencers. It is until now unknown whether intimate self-disclosure by SMIs is beneficial or detrimental to the influencer-consumer relationship. Adopting a pragmatic stance, this thesis employs a mixed methods explanatory design—two experimental studies and one interview study—to provide a nuanced understanding of the impact of influencers’ self-disclosures. Study 1 found that high depth and breadth of self-disclosure negatively impact consumer purchase intention and WOM intention. This relationship was mediated by the perceived appropriateness of the disclosure, trust, and product attitude, supporting the (ISDM) Influencer Self-disclosure Model. Study 2 confirmed the critical role that appropriateness played in the relationship between social self-disclosure and consumer outcomes. Study 3 found that followers consider travel influencers’ social self-disclosures less desirable than travel self-disclosure or travel content; but not all social self-disclosure negatively impacts consumers’ perceptions. In fact, within specific bounds (i.e., no more than 20% of content being social self-disclosure, separation of social self-disclosure from promotional content, appropriateness of delivery and content, and authenticity), social self-disclosure can provoke positive reactions from followers. Theoretical contributions to the areas of digital marketing, social media communicative norms, and travel literature; and practical implications for influencers, marketing firms, and salespeople are provided.en
dc.contributor.sponsorotheren
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectSocial Media Influencersen
dc.subjectSMIsen
dc.subjecttravel influencersen
dc.subjectconsumer outcomesen
dc.title'Urrgh.. will they stop going on about their relationships': An examination of self-disclosure by travel influencers on consumer outcomesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.embargodate2022-07-31en
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen


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