Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDave, Romeel
dc.contributor.advisorKhochfar, Sadegh
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Dylan
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-31T08:40:43Z
dc.date.available2022-03-31T08:40:43Z
dc.date.issued2022-03-31
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/38825
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2079
dc.description.abstractAs some of the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe, galaxy groups and clusters provide a unique laboratory for testing models of cosmology and galaxy evolution. While many of the basic properties of halos are determined by the dissipationless dark matter component, the baryonic components that govern the appearance of the visible matter such as the galaxies and the virialised hot gas, are less well understood. As such the co-evolution of galaxies, gas, and black holes within groups and clusters can help us examine galaxy evolution. By leveraging the benefits of simulations we can closely investigate this evolution and the effects of feedback. SIMBA is a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation run using the GIZMO code, that utilises a novel approach to black hole growth and feedback. Deviations of the X-ray scaling relations within SIMBA from self-similarity give us insight into how the implemented feedback affects halo evolution. It is then possible to determine more specifically where feedback is altering halos through their X-ray profiles. Through this work into the global X-ray properties of halos within SIMBA I have established a baseline from which to start investigating the evolution of individual halos. Tracing halos back through time allows us to pinpoint the moments, and events, which lead to significant changes both in global X-ray properties, and the finer details of the X-ray profiles. While the initial work was done using X-rays generated through PYGAD, further work was achieved through the combination of pyXSIM, SOXS telescope simulator, and XSPEC, to generate mock observations and allow for the more direct comparison of simulations to observations. This ability to accurately create mock observations from past telescopes such as Chandra aptly leads to the application of these tools towards simulating observations for future X-ray telescope projects such as Athena. As such we move from using these tools to validate the simulation, to using the simulations to make predictions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionRobson D., Davé R., 2020, MNRAS, 498, 3061en
dc.relation.hasversionRobson D., Davé R., 2021, arXiv e-prints, p. arXiv:2107.01206en
dc.subjectgalaxy clustersen
dc.subjectX-ray emissions from hot gasen
dc.subjectX-ray luminosityen
dc.subjectX-ray property profilesen
dc.subjectAthena telescopeen
dc.subjectChandra telescopeen
dc.titleSimulating the X-ray emission of hot gas in groups and clustersen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record