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dc.contributor.advisorMackenzie, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorCoombs, Nathan
dc.contributor.authorKob, Julius Janpeter
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-15T16:02:37Z
dc.date.available2022-06-15T16:02:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39115
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2366
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates how the financial risk management practice of catastrophe modelling is redefining the ontology of natural catastrophe. Drawing from and developing the concept of the ‘Anthropocene’, referring to co-production of the ‘social’ and the ‘natural’ on a planetary scale, the dissertation argues that simulation-based risk modelling of future ‘natural’ disasters in insurance and reinsurance markets is not just affecting how catastrophe is interpreted by economic agents, economised and financialised, but is also driving changes in the realisation of actual disasters. The thesis calls this recursive dynamic the ‘financial ontology of Anthropocene catastrophe’. In developing the argument, the thesis extends actor-network theoretical perspectives on the Anthropocene to take fuller account of market devices, performativity and calculative practices in finance. Documentary research, 62 interviews and 14 participant observation episodes serve to reconstruct current practices of catastrophe modelling and its history since it emerged as a boutique risk management practice in the 1980s. Ultimately, it has become embedded in the calculative practices of some of the largest insurance and financial companies in the world and underpinning a specialist disaster securities market. Adding conceptual depth and fine-grained empirical detail to literature on the financialisation-Anthropocene nexus, the dissertation asks us to reconsider the boundaries between economic representations of the world and the meaning and occurrence of catastrophes in market societies. In an age of anthropogenic climate change, the thesis also serves as an analytical and historical underpinning of epistemic practices in climate finance in the emerging, even more encompassing, ‘financial ontology of the Anthropocene’.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectdisastersen
dc.subjectcatastrophe modellingen
dc.subjectinsuranceen
dc.subjectfinanceen
dc.subjectknowledge productionen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectAnthropoceneen
dc.subjectreinsuranceen
dc.subjectcapital marketsen
dc.subjectAppropriationen
dc.subjectScience and Technologyen
dc.subjecteconomic sociologyen
dc.subjectsocial studies of financeen
dc.subjectOntologyen
dc.subjectEpistemologyen
dc.subjectrisk modellingen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectActor Network Theoryen
dc.subjectmarket devicesen
dc.subjectperformativityen
dc.subjectpragmaticsen
dc.titleRealising catastrophe: the financial ontology of the Anthropoceneen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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