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dc.contributor.advisorLim, Timothy
dc.contributor.advisorKlein, Anja
dc.contributor.authorPeeler, Josiah Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-28T11:49:55Z
dc.date.available2022-06-28T11:49:55Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-28
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39225
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2476
dc.description.abstractIn this study, I examine the linguistic infelicities (i.e., meta-textual semantics) in the Hebrew text of Jeremiah. The introduction to Proverbs, especially Prov 1:5-6, suggests that it utilises mind-advancing strategies and riddles (e.g., the acronym אֵב ֹתּ in Prov 1:10 interpreted as םָ תִּ א ךֶ רֶ דְ בּ ךֵלֵ תּ via verse 15). Ancient Near Eastern scribes, rabbinic exegetes, and the Masoretes also display an awareness of meta-textual semantics in their textual production and exegesis. Meta-textual semantics, however, has not been systematically explored across an entire book in the Hebrew Bible. Several scholars (e.g., A. Hurvitz, S. Noegel, and G. Rendsburg) have signalled the exegetical significance of oddities or coherence in the text of the Hebrew Bible (i.e., a text is confused or well-formed to illustrate its message). Their studies are illuminating but too brief and selective. Additionally, they lack a methodology. I, therefore, enumerate a methodology which follows two paths — textual contortion or textual cohesion. I examine abnormalities or cohesion in Hebrew Jeremiah to determine if an element is a case of authorial or scribal stylistics or if it is a textual corruption as evidenced by the extant ancient witnesses. If neither of these sufficiently clarifies the questionable textual element, then I assess whether it is a case of textual contortion (i.e., a disharmonious textual element creating a contextual effect which exemplifies a major or minor contextual theme) or textual cohesion (i.e., a harmonious textual element orchestrating a contextual effect to demonstrate a contextual theme). For example, Saul’s “lacking” regnal dates in 1 Sam 13:1 illustrate his short, failed kingship (i.e., textual contortion). Elijah responding identically to YHWH in 1 Kgs 19:10 and 14 demonstrates that he is unmoved in his faithfulness to YHWH (i.e., textual cohesion). If a suggestion does not fit a major or minor theme in the context, then this oddity cannot be a case of meta-textual semantics. Meta-textual semantics in Hebrew Jeremiah appears in the orthography (e.g., אר ֹבּ in Jer 2:13), syntax (e.g., anacoluthon in Jer 4:23-26), and morphology (e.g., geminate verbs in Jer 6:9) of the text as well as literary aspects of the text (e.g., palindrome mimicking siege conditions in Jer 52:6). The examples appear in the words of YHWH, Jeremiah, the narrator, and the Judahite people in both the prosaic and poetic portions of the book. There are several implications of this study. Meta-textual semantics is more extensively distributed in the Hebrew Bible than previously recognised. Scribes were competent readers of Hebrew text and contributed to meta-textual semantics in major and minor ways in the text. An odd linguistic element in the text is not necessarily a textual corruption. An author’s use of meta-textual semantics might lead to additional cases of meta-textual semantics created by a scribe in the same text and context. Finally, the versional translators of the Hebrew Bible may be motivated to make meta-textual semantic choices when crafting their translations of their Hebrew Vorlage.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectHebrew languageen
dc.subjectHebrew Bible/Old Testamenten
dc.subjectMeta-Textual Semanticsen
dc.subjectAncient Hebrewen
dc.subjectClassical Hebrewen
dc.subjectHebrew linguisticsen
dc.subjectBiblical Hebrewen
dc.subjectscribeen
dc.subjecttextual cohesionen
dc.subjecttextual contortionen
dc.subjectform and meaningen
dc.subjectJeremiahen
dc.subjectprophetic literatureen
dc.subjectexegesis of prophetic literatureen
dc.subjectstylisticsen
dc.subjectHebrew orthographyen
dc.subjectscribal activity in ancient Near Easten
dc.subjectYHWH's words in Jeremiahen
dc.subjectclose readingen
dc.titleMeta-textual semantics in the Hebrew text of Jeremiahen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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