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dc.contributor.advisorRawlinson, Julian
dc.contributor.advisorMudd, Tom
dc.contributor.advisorMacdonald, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorCanny, Nicholas Kirk
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-01T11:39:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-13T09:31:37Z
dc.date.available2022-07-01T11:39:23Z
dc.date.available2022-07-13T09:31:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-07-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2519
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39268
dc.description.abstractThis research presents an exploration of personalised humanised approaches to performing and controlling digital music, as well as encapsulating human presence and feel in digital musical performance tools. Specifically, this involved the development of a hybrid guitar instrument with integrated hardware and software components, to produce an instrument that serves simultaneously as a digital controller for computer-generated sounds and as a conventional guitar. Blended practices of guitar and digital music instrument techniques utilise pre-existing skills and musical background as effectively as possible and provide opportunities to transfer skills from one domain to the other. This thesis outlines the practices and methods used to develop the instrument accompanied by a portfolio of compositions and software. The portfolio of compositions consists of four solo electronic pieces, as well as one piece that includes an instrumental ensemble. The compositions demonstrate and evidence the practical applications of the software and instrument while addressing their relationship to the key theme of ‘humanisation’. The work examines a broad range of topics such as recycling virtuosity; using the guitar as a sound source and digital controller; simulating human imperfection and behaviours in software; improvising with composed material in real-time; extending and augmenting human control; liveness and the visibility of human agency. To discover an approach for a bespoke physical instrument and software environment, this thesis reviews some existing practices, literature and research. In addition, it explores considerations of compositional and performative methods that allow guitarists to control and improvise with digital compositions in real-time, as well as computer improvisation methods that aid in the interpretation of compositions. This exploration contributes novel control and interaction methods for digital environments that are useful for enhancing and exposing human agency. The research is linked to recent developments and thinking in electronic music, touching on areas such as augmented instruments, New Instruments for Musical Expression, controllerism, virtuosity and mastery, tactile feel, expressivity, mapping strategies and interactive environments. This research project adopts Donald Schön’s theory of reflective practice to illustrate the advantages of these approaches for guitarists, composers, improvisers and digital musicians at large. While contributing knowledge to the field through a suite of software tools, compositions, control strategies and the design of the hybrid guitar instrument, presented through discussion, diagrams and video documentation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectMusicen
dc.subjectHumanisationen
dc.subjectperformanceen
dc.subjectcompositionen
dc.subjectimprovisationen
dc.subjectdigital technologyen
dc.subjectaugmented instrumentsen
dc.titleManifestation of human agency designing the hybrid guitar for the humanisation of digital composition and performanceen
dc.title.alternativeThe manifestation of human agency designing the hybrid guitar for the humanisation of digital composition and performanceen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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