Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKreber, Carolin
dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, Charles
dc.contributor.advisorThorburn, Malcolm
dc.contributor.authorJamieson, Ann Jane McConnell
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-11T13:30:53Z
dc.date.available2022-10-11T13:30:53Z
dc.date.issued2022-10-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39420
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2670
dc.description.abstractThe dominance of the discourses of globalisation and the neoliberal ideology of the free market have led to teachers being considered as central to ensuring the global competitiveness of a nation’s education service and of its citizens. The neoliberal policy reforms of New Labour (1997-2010) and the Coalition governments of 2010- 2015 were continued by the Conservative governments from 2015 through to the present time in 2022. It is in this political context that an ongoing teacher recruitment and retention problem exists, and I have argued that these pervading neoliberal policies have contributed significantly to these issues. The impact of a globalised and neoliberal policy direction has seen Initial Teacher Training (ITT) in England being overtaken by a more instrumental, action-oriented training approach, which I challenge, arguing that teaching is a moral profession which requires teachers to be educated as public good professionals. National and international teacher education literature recognises the moral nature of teaching, and the moral role of teachers yet provides very little on how these matters are dealt with within ITT programmes. To address this gap, I designed a case study that focussed on the public good professional capability expansion of six Teach First trainee teachers undergoing their ITT year within one Teach First partnership in the North of England. It has been argued that each of the professions gets its core purpose and value from the contribution it makes to human flourishing and a good society. Accepting that a conception of the good life includes happiness and wellbeing, it can be further argued that such a life requires certain human capabilities (Sen, 1985, Nussbaum, 2000). Capabilities are conceptualised as a person's real opportunities to do and be what they have reason to value, and what he or she is able to be or do (functioning) can determine the value of their given life. Appropriately then, the theoretical framework used to interrogate the data incorporated the capability approach (CA) to human development (Sen, 1985, Nussbaum, 2000) and in particular the Public-Good Professional Capabilities Index (PPCI) developed by Walker and McLean, (2013), as well as the literature conceptualising the moral nature of teaching. An interpretative, constructivist method underpinned the gathering and analysis of the data. This approach reflected the focus of the study which was to understand and make sense of the multiple realities, experiences and views of the trainee teachers. Data were gathered using two focus group discussions and two individual face-to-face interviews at four points across the ITT year. The analysis established how the trainee teachers understood and came to value the professional capabilities in the PPCI. Enabling and constraining factors to capability formation and functioning were analysed in order to establish the extent to which their valued capabilities and functioning could be realised. The findings revealed that the CA and the PPCI offer trainee teachers a wider vision of what teaching and learning entails, offering them a contrasting vision to the instrumental, action-oriented view of teacher knowledge and preparation that pervaded their Teach First ITT programme. The CA with its emphasis on human flourishing and the PPCI with its expansive view of a range of public-good professional capabilities send a message that foregrounds possibilities and aspirations, while directly engaging trainee teachers with issues of social justice. Encountering such frameworks would broaden student teachers’ visions of the purposes and possibilities of teaching and learning. An adapted PPCI for trainee teachers is presented that reveals the valued professional capabilities and functionings held by the group as well as the enabling and constraining factors to their capability formation and achieved functioning.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectteacher recruitmenten
dc.subjectglobalisationen
dc.subjectteaching as a moral professionen
dc.subjectpublic good professionalsen
dc.subjectpublic gooden
dc.subjectmoral nature of teachingen
dc.subjecttrainee teachersen
dc.subjectprofessional capabilitiesen
dc.titleMoral profession of teaching: a case study investigating trainee teachers' public good capability formation and functioningen
dc.title.alternativeThe moral profession of teaching: a case study investigating trainee teachers' public good capability formation and functioningen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameEdD Doctor of Educationen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record