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dc.contributor.advisorPalattiyil, George
dc.contributor.advisorGulland, Jackie
dc.contributor.advisorMcCusker, Pearse
dc.contributor.authorRose, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-17T14:08:00Z
dc.date.available2022-11-17T14:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-17
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39491
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2741
dc.description.abstractThe emotional resilience of social workers has increasingly been a focus of research, particularly in response to high levels of stress in the profession. Most of this research has been carried out in relation to social workers generically or those working within children’s services. There is a dearth of research into the emotional resilience of social workers in adult services, which this study aims to address. Interviews were conducted with twenty-eight social workers based in local authority adult services to explore how they conceptualised emotional resilience and experienced it in the context of their professional roles. In addition, nine of these social workers completed diary entries to provide a ‘snapshot’ picture of resilience in their day-to-day working lives. A further eight interviews were carried out with social work managers to gain an overview of how resilience may be enhanced within teams and organisations. The findings suggest that social workers generally felt well equipped to manage the emotional nature of engaging with and supporting service users and saw this as the essence of their role. Organisational pressures and expectations were identified as a significant source of adversity such that working conditions often detracted from rather than enhanced emotional resilience. Based on the findings of the study, a holistic framework of emotional resilience is presented comprising of the distinct domains of personal, relational, cultural and structural factors, while recognising that these domains are interwoven and mutually influential. A key finding from the study is the close connection between the emotional resilience of social workers and a commitment to carrying out their role within ethical and moral principles. Thus, professional integrity is identified as a concept which unites all of the four domains and underpins the resilience of social workers. It is argued that a more compassionate climate in adult social work, which promotes a relationship-based approach to practice and prioritises the welfare of service users and social workers, is integral to professional integrity and the nurturing of emotional resilience. Such a climate may enable social workers to move beyond conceptualisations of resilience as survival within stressful working environments towards notions of thriving and flourishing as they carry out their role in ethical and compassionate ways.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionRose, S. and Palattiyil, G. (2020) Surviving or Thriving? Enhancing the Emotional Resilience of Social Workers in their Organisational Settings. Journal of Social Work, 20(1), 23-42.en
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.subjectwellbeingen
dc.subjectorganisational cultureen
dc.subjectprofessional integrityen
dc.titleTopping up the tank: enhancing the emotional resilience of social workers in local authority adult servicesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


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