Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Laura
dc.contributor.advisorLang, Anouk
dc.contributor.advisorMcCartney, Nicola
dc.contributor.authorHawthorne, Katie
dc.date.accessioned2022-11-25T12:56:53Z
dc.date.available2022-11-25T12:56:53Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-25
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1842/39529
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7488/era/2779
dc.description.abstract‘Liveness’ is a contested and often controversial term within theatre and performance studies. It is commonly used to describe sensations related to immediacy, spontaneity, unrepeatability, and co-presence, and often held in oppositions to ideas of the digital. Previous scholarship has taken a broad approach to understanding and defining liveness, for instance in Philip Auslander’s foundational monograph Liveness (1999), which considers liveness within the Western canon of live performance in general - but this thesis argues that liveness is often culturally and contextually contingent. To do so, it takes a comparative, material, and ethnographic approach, using case studies from Edinburgh and Berlin to reveal increasingly flexible, nuanced, and diverse experiences of liveness within performances that have been shaped by factors including funding landscapes, arts festivals, and hierarchies of cultural value. By focusing on Edinburgh and Berlin, the case studies in this thesis reveal how liveness is created, valued, and marketed differently in two Western European capital cities that have considerably different theatre industries, making the argument for further contextual studies into the phenomenon. These case studies present emerging modes of digitally aided performance that challenge established definitions of liveness within theatre studies and the theatre industry and explore how liveness in performance relates to liveness as it is understood in the broader context of digital media. The thesis develops three key terms – digital distribution, digital mediation, and digital location – in order to differentiate between these emerging modes of performance: digital distribution is used to consider digitally aided modes of distributing and documenting theatre; digital mediation describes performances that use digital tools to mediate the relationship between performer and audience; and digital location examines performances that take place in digital, rather than physical, performance spaces. Collectively, these terms consider the time, place, and space of digitally aided performance to explore how far liveness is a contextual phenomenon.en
dc.contributor.sponsorWolfson Foundationen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.relation.hasversionHawthorne, Katie, ‘Experimental Theatre at Edinburgh Festivals 2017’, The Skinny, 2 August 2017. <https://www.theskinny.co.uk/festivals/edinburgh-fringe/theatre/experimental-theatre-edinburgh-festivals-2017> [accessed 4 June 2021]en
dc.relation.hasversionHawthorne, Katie, ‘Edinburgh Fringe 2018: Multimedia Theatre’, The Skinny, 30 July 2018. <https://www.theskinny.co.uk/festivals/edinburgh-fringe/theatre/technically-intimate> [accessed 30 May 2019]en
dc.relation.hasversionHawthorne, Katie, ‘NTS Celebrates Transgender Experiences with Adam’, The Skinny, 31 July 2017. <https://www.theskinny.co.uk/festivals/edinburgh-fringe/theatre/the-national-theatre-of-scotland-talk-about-adam> [accessed 5 October 2021]en
dc.relation.hasversionHawthorne, Katie, ‘Holly Herndon: The Musician Who Birthed an AI Baby’, The Guardian, 2 May 2019. <https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/may/02/holly-herndon-on-her-musical-baby-spawn-i-wanted-to-find-a-new-sound> [accessed 30 March 2022]en
dc.relation.hasversionHawthorne, Katie, ‘Lost in a Virtual Forest’, Exberliner (2019), p. 31en
dc.subjectlive theatreen
dc.subjectlivenessen
dc.subjectdigitally aided performanceen
dc.subjecttheatrical productionsen
dc.subjectdigital distributionen
dc.subjectdigital mediationen
dc.subjectdigital locationen
dc.titleContextualising liveness: digitally distributed, digitally mediated and digitally located theatre in Edinburgh and Berlin, 2017-2019en
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record