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PLoS Medicine

dc.contributor.authorNorman, J. E.
dc.contributor.authorMorris, C.
dc.contributor.authorChalmers, J.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-22T15:19:25Z
dc.date.available2010-11-22T15:19:25Z
dc.date.issued2009-09
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277en
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.1000153en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/4400
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Rates of preterm birth are rising worldwide. Studies from the United States and Latin America suggest that much of this rise relates to increased rates of medically indicated preterm birth. In contrast, European and Australian data suggest that increases in spontaneous preterm labour also play a role. We aimed, in a population-based database of 5 million people, to determine the temporal trends and obstetric antecedents of singleton preterm birth and its associated neonatal mortality and morbidity for the period 1980-2004. METHODS AND FINDINGS: There were 1.49 million births in Scotland over the study period, of which 5.8% were preterm. We found a percentage increase in crude rates of both spontaneous preterm birth per 1,000 singleton births (10.7%, p<0.01) and medically indicated preterm births (41.2%, p<0.01), which persisted when adjusted for maternal age at delivery. The greater proportion of spontaneous preterm births meant that the absolute increase in rates of preterm birth in each category were similar. Of specific maternal complications, essential and pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and placenta praevia played a decreasing role in preterm birth over the study period, with gestational and pre-existing diabetes playing an increasing role. There was a decline in stillbirth, neonatal, and extended perinatal mortality associated with preterm birth at all gestation over the study period but an increase in the rate of prolonged hospital stay for the neonate. Neonatal mortality improved in all subgroups, regardless of obstetric antecedent of preterm birth or gestational age. In the 28 wk and greater gestational groups we found a reduction in stillbirths and extended perinatal mortality for medically induced but not spontaneous preterm births (in the absence of maternal complications) although at the expense of a longer stay in neonatal intensive care. This improvement in stillbirth and neonatal mortality supports the decision making behind the 34% increase in elective/induced preterm birth in these women. Although improvements in neonatal outcomes overall are welcome, preterm birth still accounts for over 66% of singleton stillbirths, 65% of singleton neonatal deaths, and 67% of infants whose stay in the neonatal unit is "prolonged," suggesting this condition remains a significant contributor to perinatal mortality and morbidity. CONCLUSIONS: In our population, increases in spontaneous and medically induced preterm births have made equal contributions to the rising rate of preterm birth. Despite improvements in related perinatal mortality, preterm birth remains a major obstetric and neonatal problem, and its frequency is increasing. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleThe effect of changing patterns of obstetric care in Scotland (1980-2004) on rates of preterm birth and its neonatal consequences: perinatal database studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.1000153en
rps.issue9en
rps.volume6en
rps.titlePLoS Medicineen
dc.extent.pageNumberse1000153en
dc.date.updated2010-11-22T15:19:25Z
dc.identifier.eIssn1549-1676en


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