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dc.contributor.authorStone, John Oen
dc.contributor.authorBalco, Gregory Aen
dc.contributor.authorSugden, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorCaffee, Marc Wen
dc.contributor.authorSass III, Louis Cen
dc.contributor.authorCowdery, Seth Gen
dc.contributor.authorSiddoway, Christineen
dc.coverage.spatial4en
dc.date.accessioned2004-04-06T13:28:08Z
dc.date.available2004-04-06T13:28:08Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationScience, Vol 299, Issue 5603, 99-102 , 3 January 2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/299/5603/99
dc.identifier.uri[DOI: 10.1126/science.1077998]
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/461
dc.description.abstractSurface exposure ages of glacial deposits in the Ford Ranges of western Marie Byrd Land indicate continuous thinning of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet by more than 700 meters near the coast throughout the past 10,000 years. Deglaciation lagged the disappearance of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere by thousands of years and may still be under way. These results provide further evidence that parts of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet are on a long-term trajectory of decline. West Antarctic melting contributed water to the oceans in the late Holocene and may continue to do so in the future.en
dc.format.extent196819 bytesen
dc.format.extent2252100 bytesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Scienceen
dc.titleHolocene Deglaciation of Marie Byrd Land, West Antarcticaen
dc.typeArticleen


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