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dc.contributor.authorWest, Stuart Aen
dc.contributor.authorReece, S Een
dc.contributor.authorSheldon, Ben Cen
dc.coverage.spatial8en
dc.date.accessioned2004-04-12T10:52:56Z
dc.date.available2004-04-12T10:52:56Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationHeredity (2002) 88, 117–124
dc.identifier.issn1365-2540
dc.identifier.uriDOI: 10.1038/sj/hdy/6800018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/474
dc.description.abstractSex ratio theory attempts to explain variation at all levels (species, population, individual, brood) in the proportion of offspring that are male (the sex ratio). In many cases this work has been extremely successful, providing qualitative and even quantitative explanations of sex ratio variation. However, this is not always the situation, and one of the greatest remaining problems is explaining broad taxonomic patterns. Specifically, why do different organisms show so much variation in the amount and precision with which they adjust their offspring sex ratios?en
dc.format.extent121659 bytesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.titleSex ratiosen
dc.typeArticleen


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