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dc.contributor.advisorHurford, James
dc.contributor.authorSzeto, Pui Yiu
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-07T14:50:48Z
dc.date.available2011-09-07T14:50:48Z
dc.date.issued2010-08-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/5340
dc.description.abstractLanguage can be viewed as sexual displays from an evolutionary perspective. As both sexes in humans contribute significantly to parental care, we can expect that both males and females use language to display their favourable qualities in order to attract potential mates. In this study, 50 participants (22 male, 28 female) rated 30 vignettes, in which a male or female protagonist attempted to impress an opposite sex friend in a conversation. In both male-female and female-male flirtations, conversations revealing the speaker’s positive character traits were the most highly rated while those explicitly showing the speaker’s sexual interest in the potential partner were the most poorly rated. Despite the similarities, there were significant sex differences in the ratings of some individual vignettes and item-groups. Such differences would be chiefly discussed from an evolutionary perspective.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectsexual selectionen
dc.subjectmate choiceen
dc.subjectspeech contenten
dc.titleOrigins of Language in relation to Sexual Selectionen
dc.title.alternativethe effect of mutual mate choice on sex differences in speech contenten
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.relation.referencesSzeto, P. Y. (2009). ‘What features of human language are sexually attractive?’ Essay submitted for the course Origins and Evolution of Language.en
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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