Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLaidlaw, Kenneth
dc.contributor.authorHutchison, Douglas Robert
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-17T15:09:01Z
dc.date.available2012-05-17T15:09:01Z
dc.date.issued2009-02-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/5948
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To see whether a cognitive behavioural guided self-help approach can reduce mental health symptoms, which patients might benefit most, and whether such a treatment increases self-efficacy and internal locus of control. Design. Repeated measures and correlational designs were used. Methods. 173 patients were recruited at a cognitive behavioural guided self-help clinic in Edinburgh, of which 97 completed the three-session intervention. Verbal IQ was estimated with the National Adult Reading Test (NART). Measures of emotional symptoms, self-efficacy and locus of control were taken before and after treatment, with follow-up at one month and six months. Results. Patients completing the intervention made favourable gains, which were maintained at six months. Self-efficacy and locus of control measures were not robustly correlated with mental health improvement, but did show pre- to posttreatment changes in themselves. Conclusions. Guided self-help appears to be a useful treatment option for those with depression, anxiety and stress. The implications of the findings, the strengths and limitations of the study, and areas for future research are discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectguided self-helpen
dc.subjectself-efficacyen
dc.subjectlocus of controlen
dc.titleRole of self-efficacy, locus of control, and intellectual ability in guided self-help for depression, anxiety and stressen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDClinPsychol Doctor of Clinical Psychologyen


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record