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dc.contributor.advisorGinn, Franklin
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Jacob
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-23T08:59:08Z
dc.date.available2012-08-23T08:59:08Z
dc.date.issued15/08/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/6337
dc.description.abstractEthical considerations have successfully transitioned from considering humans exclusively, to specific animal species, to non-human life on the planet as a whole, yet they remain inescapably earth-bound and geocentric, often conflating ‘life’ and ‘nature’ into a unitary consideration. Contradictions between the sub-, and superlunary worlds abound, but space can be a valuable tool through which to explore the place of the human. Unable to travel to the stars, this dissertation explores the imagined worlds of science fiction, looking to the work of Giorgio Agamben’s Anthropological Machine as it pertains to the representation of aliens in Star Trek. It finds that Star Trek works to keep humans human by identifying common traits in others and subsuming them under a banner of humanity. When this fails, Star Trek works to reject the other entirely by casting them as death. Further, despite the role that an exploration of technology can play in redefining the human’s place, Star Trek rejects its contribution in favour of line-in-the-sand distinctions. The result, however, means that the definition of the human is constantly shifting and morphing. Ultimately, this perpetual reimagining of the human in the face of new externalities means that otherness remains at the forefront of the show’s narrative. The work of the anthropological machine, once exposed, makes it clear that the bounded human individual Star Trek seeks to preserve does not really exist, but rather shows that the human in Star Trek is entirely created by its relationships with others around it.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectAgambenen
dc.subjectAnthropological Machineen
dc.subjectStar Treken
dc.subjectOthernessen
dc.subjectDifferenceen
dc.subjectCyborgen
dc.subjectPosthumanen
dc.subjectHarawayen
dc.subjectPettmanen
dc.subjectMSc Environment, Culture and Societyen
dc.titleStar Trek and the Anthropological Machine: Eliding Difference to Stay Humanen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.relation.referencesAgamben, 2004. The Open: Man and Animal. Stanford University Pressen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen_US


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