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dc.contributor.authorCarmena, Maren
dc.contributor.authorEarnshaw, William C.en
dc.coverage.spatial13en
dc.date.accessioned2005-02-16T16:05:28Z
dc.date.available2005-02-16T16:05:28Z
dc.date.issued2003-11
dc.identifier.citationCarmena M, Earnshaw WC, NATURE REVIEWS MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY, 4 (11): 842-854 NOV 2003
dc.identifier.uridoi:10.1038/nrm1245
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.nature.com/
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/703
dc.description.abstractAurora is the name given to a family of highly conserved protein kinases with essential roles in many aspects of cell division. Yeasts have a single Aurora kinase, whereas mammals have three: Aurora A, B and C. During mitosis, Aurora kinases regulate the structure and function of the cytoskeleton and chromosomes and the interactions between these two at the kinetochore. They also regulate signalling by the spindle-assembly checkpoint pathway and cytokinesis. Perturbation of Aurora kinase expression or function might lead to cancer.en
dc.format.extent369210 bytesen
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.subjectAurora kinasesen
dc.subjectcytokinesisen
dc.subjectcell divisionen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectcellularen
dc.subjectgeographyen
dc.titleThe cellular geography of Aurora kinasesen
dc.typeArticleen


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