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dc.contributor.advisorWelburn, Sue
dc.contributor.advisorTaylor, David
dc.contributor.advisorMutapi, Francisca
dc.contributor.authorRujeni, Nadine
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-15T15:59:22Z
dc.date.available2013-11-15T15:59:22Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/8160
dc.description.abstractUrogenital schistosomiasis, due to Schistosoma haematobium, is one of the helminth infections of public health importance in sub-Saharan Africa where children carry the heaviest burden of infection. Treatment with the drug praziquantel is the only widely available tool for control. Current schistosome control programs are essentially school-based and exclude younger pre-school children. However, increasing reports of significant infection levels in this age group call for the inclusion of these young children in control programs. The hygiene hypothesis suggests that helminth infections, including schistosome infection, may protect against atopy, implying that helminth eradication may carry a detrimental burden of immune disorders. However, this conjecture is controversial. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between schistosome infection and atopy. In a comparative epidemiological approach between two schistosome endemic areas with differing infection levels, it is shown that atopy is inversely associated with current schistosome infection intensity but not with cumulative history of infection. This inverse relationship was subsequently shown to be associated with the levels of soluble CD23, the low affinity IgE receptor, but not with the polyclonal IgE stimulation. However, while praziquantel treatment was associated with an increase in schistosome-specific responses, a decline in atopic responses was observed in these communities, suggesting that treatment differentially affect anti-schistosome and atopic responses. In addition, the study has shown that praziquantel treatment of preschool age children increases, quantitatively and qualitatively, their schistosome-specific antibody responses purportedly associated with resistance to schistosome infection/reinfection.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen_US
dc.relation.hasversionRujeni, N., Nausch, N., Midzi, N., Mduluza, T., Taylor, W.D., Mutapi, F. (2012) Atopy is inversely related to schistosome infection intensity: a comparative study in Zimbabwean villages with distinct levels of Schistosoma haematobium infection. Inter Archive Allergy Immunol 158(3): 288-298en_US
dc.relation.hasversionRujeni, N., Nausch, N., Midzi, N., Mduluza, T., Taylor, W.D. & Mutapi, F. (2012) Schistosoma haematobium infection levels determine the effect of praziquantel treatment on anti-schistosome and anti-mite antibodies. Parasite Immunol 34 (6) 330- 340en_US
dc.relation.hasversionRujeni, N., Taylor, W. D., Mutapi, F. (2012) Human schistosome infection and allergic sensitisation. Journal of Parasitology Research doi: 10.1155/2012/154743en_US
dc.relation.hasversionImai, N., Rujeni, N., Nausch, N., Bourke, C., Appleby, L. et al. (2011) Exposure, infection, systemic cytokine levels and antibody responses in young children concurrently exposed to Plasmodium falciparum and Schistosoma haematobium infection. Parasitology 138(12): 1519-1533en_US
dc.relation.hasversionMutapi, F., Rujeni, N., Bourke, C., Mitchell, K., Appleby, L. et al. (2011) Schistosoma haematobium treatment in 1-5 year old children: safety and efficacy of the antihelminthic drug praziquantel. Plos NTD 5(5): e1143en_US
dc.subjectschistosomiasisen_US
dc.subjectatopyen_US
dc.subjecttreatmenten_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectpraziquantelen_US
dc.titleImmuno-epidemiology of uro-genital schistosomiasis : focusing on atopy and pre-school age childrenen_US
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen_US
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen_US
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophyen_US


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