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dc.contributor.advisorEydmann, Stuarten
dc.contributor.authorLipton, Patriciaen
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-29T11:02:58Z
dc.date.available2013-11-29T11:02:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/8207
dc.description.abstractIn the twenty-first century, it may be surprising to learn that many religious institutions - and their historic places of worship - still maintain a position of privilege within the law. Over the course of the last century, churches, mosques, and synagogues catered to the building code requirements, such as fire escapes and disabled access, yet remained customarily untouched by preservation policy. This contested issue has caused several investigative commissions, at least one never-ending voluntary pilot scheme, and countless court cases. To understand the variety of approaches to preserving religious structures, this dissertation will look at the history and development of policies in England, Scotland, and the United States. Although this dissertation will broadly examine the place of houses of worship in preservation, each country has a particular case worthy of examining in greater detail.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectChurch Conservationen
dc.subjectPreservationen
dc.subjectPlace of Worshipen
dc.subjectMSc Architectural Conservationen
dc.titlePlaying The Devil’s Advocate: Historic Places Of Worship And Preservation Policies In England, Scotland, And The United Statesen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen


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