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dc.contributor.advisorKirby, Simonen
dc.contributor.authorDoney, Tomen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-26T15:32:37Z
dc.date.available2014-03-26T15:32:37Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/8601
dc.description.abstractErnst Mayr's Proximate-Ultimate distinction has come under scrutiny in recent years for its supposed failure to account for reciprocal evolutionary processes such as niche-construction and intersexual selection. This article defends Mayr's distinction on the grounds that these reciprocal processes can easily be explained within the explanatory framework. It then goes on to asses the claims of certain authors such as Smith and Kirby (2008) who's conclusions would suggest that the "ultimate" explanation for the emergence of linguistic structure lies within cultural evolution. If verified, this would break the monopoly of natural selection as the only known process leading to "the appearance of complex design" in the natural world.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Edinburghen
dc.subjectProximate-Ultimateen
dc.subjectIterated Learningen
dc.subjectLinguistic Structureen
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.titleThe Proximate-Ultimate Distinction and its Relation to the Emergence of Linguistic Structureen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMastersen
dc.type.qualificationnameMSc Master of Scienceen
dcterms.accessRightsRestricted Accessen


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