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dc.contributor.authorKeighren, Innes M
dc.coverage.spatial16en
dc.date.accessioned2006-04-11T15:19:34Z
dc.date.available2006-04-11T15:19:34Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationKeighren, Innes M. 2005. Of poles, pressmen, and the newspaper public: reporting the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition, 1902–1904. Scottish Geographical Journal 121 (2):203–218.en
dc.identifier.issn0036-9225
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1842/893
dc.description.abstractBetween 1902 and 1904, the Scots naturalist William Speirs Bruce (1867-1921) led the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition on a voyage of oceanographical discovery. Unlike other British expeditions undertaken during the ‘Heroic Age’ of polar exploration, Bruce’s Expedition placed undivided attention upon scientific accumulation, and dismissed the value of territorial acquisition. As a consequence, Bruce and his Expedition were subject to a distinct interpretation by the press. With reference to contemporary newspaper reports, this paper traces the unique mediation of Bruce, and reveals how geographies of reporting served to communicate locally particular representations of him, and of the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition.en
dc.format.extent2068164 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoyal Scottish Geographical Societyen
dc.subjectWilliam Speirs Bruceen
dc.subjectpolar explorationen
dc.subjectnewspapersen
dc.subjectjournalismen
dc.subjectgeography of reportingen
dc.titleOf poles, pressmen, and the newspaper public: reporting the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition, 1902–1904en
dc.typeArticleen


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